LTI NY

May 16, 2016

Domingo Millela for T Magazine / New York Times

Where the Swedes Go to Be (Really) Alone
Domingo Millela
T Magazine / The New York Times
May 2016

 

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Domingo Millela: T Magazine, 2016

 

 

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Domingo Millela: T Magazine, 2016

 

 

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January 23, 2014

Joni Sternbach at Rick Wester Fine Art

Not Long Hidden
Rick Wester Fine Art
January 23 – March 1

 

Single-handedly punching back at winter, Rick Wester Fine Art has mounted an invitingly warm group-exhibition celebrating the tactual essence of summer featuring some excellent surf imagery from our great friend, Joni Sternbach (among others).

 

 

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Joni Sternbach: 13.08.29 #53 Lisa + Mikey, Ditch Plains, Montauk, 2013
30 x 40 archival pigment print

 

From the gallery’s press release:

 

In the midst of the coldest winter in New York in 20 years it seems that no amount of freezing sunshine, Vitamin D or dry radiator heat can overcome the chill of the wind off the Hudson, East or Harlem Rivers. Rick Wester Fine Art is pleased to present a visual antidote to Seasonal Affective Disorder with NOT LONG HIDDEN, a group exhibition that combines the work of five photographers who have explored and incorporated into their work a highly visceral and sensual vision of summer light, color and tone. Kate Joyce (Chicago, IL), Jakub Karwowski (Krakow), Joe Maloney (Hancock, NY), Cheryle St. Onge (Durham, NH) and Joni Sternbach (Brooklyn, NY) all share unique sensibilities towards how radiant light shapes their imagery. Like music that transforms auditory sensation into emotion and action, the photographers of NOT LONG HIDDEN create the sensory equivalent of stopping, mid – step on a summer’s day, to take in the color and absorb its warmth. Each pursues distinctly different subject matter and approaches, however all dwell within the realm of the documentary photograph with remarkably individual results .

 

Click here to see more from NOT LONG HIDDEN at Rick Wester Fine Art

 

 

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December 31, 2013

Richard Mosse in ForeignPolicy.com

This year’s impressive round-up of the Leading 100 Global Thinkers of 2013 from ForeignPolicy.com included the extraordinary photographer (and our client!) Richard Mosse. While Mosse’s use of Kodak’s Aerochrome film stock has been widely seen and well received throughout the photographic arts community; his project’s content is particularly deserving of this broader acclaim on the international stage for its cultural impact as well.

 

 

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Richard Mosse:
Tutsi Town, North Kivu, Eastern Congo, 2010

 

The following is re-posted from ForeignPolicy.com:

 

For Seeing War Through a New Lens

 

Richard Mosse’s conceptual photos of the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s war-torn east are allowing viewers to see conflict in a way they never imagined they could. Straddling the line between art and journalism, Mosse has photographed the region with an obsolete infrared film that renders shades of green into vibrant pinks, roses, and magentas. The film, Kodak Aerochrome, was designed by the U.S. military decades ago to detect camouflage.

Mosse stole the show at the 2013 Venice Biennale art exhibition with The Enclave, a video installation filmed in the DRC with 16 mm Aerochrome. To gather his material, he took a cinematographer and composer and embedded with armed fighters. The resulting images are striking. They include rebels wearing bubblegum-tinted fatigues amid dreamy, psychedelic landscapes. “The idea was to use this medium to see into the unseen, to reveal the hidden and make visible the invisible of this forgotten conflict,” Mosse told CNN.

The photographer, who has also worked in Iraq, says the goal of his groundbreaking work is to bring “two counterworlds into collision: art’s potential to represent narratives so painful that they exist beyond language, and photography’s capacity to document specific tragedies and communicate them to the world.” Mosse has certainly done that, catching the eyes and perhaps the consciences of viewers.

 

 

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November 4, 2010

Kodak sees the light (and remembers 8 x 10 film) …

We were a bit surprised when Kodak left cut sheet 8 x 10 off the the menu for their new Portra 400 film … but all is right in the world again. This was announced during Photo Expo here in New York Last week:

FILM OPTIONS FOR LARGE FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHERS

Continuing its ongoing commitment to film photography, Kodak announced it will offer the new KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 400 Film, first introduced at Photokina, in 8×10 format. The new film achieves the finest grain structure available in a 400-speed color negative film, by incorporating KODAK VISION Motion Picture Film, plus Antenna Dye Sensitization in the cyan and magenta emulsion layers.

Thank you good people at Kodak …

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