LTI NY

fine art project archive: Lightside Photographic Services offers the complete service of overseeing and organizing all stages of processing, printing and presentation Our clients include photographers, artists, galleries, museums, art consultants, curators and collectors who need their photography expertly prepared for exhibition, reproduction or sale.
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Memory Recall Pattern
Thomas Dozol
Andersen’s Amaliegade, Copenhagen
21 June – 17 August 2018

 

 

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Thomas Dozol: 41.B/Bl, 2017
56 x 56 cm unique screenprint on archival inkjet

 

Thomas Dozol continues his deep dive into intimate portraiture with this Copenhagen based exhibition titled Memory Recall Pattern. You can read Andersen’s Amaliegade press release here.

 

 

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Thomas Dozol: Memory Recall Pattern,  Andersen’s Amaliegade, 2018

 

 

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Thomas Dozol: Memory Recall Pattern,  Andersen’s Amaliegade, 2018

 

LTI-Lightside has been working with Thomas Dozol since 2010 – view more of his work here.

 

 

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Black Crow
Rob Hann
Nässjö Konsthall, Sweden
June 16 – August 18

 

 

IMG_0640_adjRob Hann: Black Crow at Nässjö Konsthall, 2018

 

Once you learn that the title for Rob Hann’s exhibition Black Crow was inspired by the Joni Mitchell song of the same name — and you take in the fact that he’s literally logged in thousands of miles in search of his haunting landscape based images — it becomes very hard to get that song (and her sound) from the album Hejira out of your head when viewing his work …. well, if you’re a Joni Mitchell fan, I suppose.

 

But this work isn’t about Joni Mitchell — and as if to cement that sentiment, Rob has a book of these images coming in October called Diesel Fried Chicken, which, almost seems like the literary equivalent of a DJ scratching the needle straight across the album and grinding that association to a halt (!)

 

 

 

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Rob Hann: Black Crow at Nässjö Konsthall, 2018

 

 

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Rob Hann: Black Crow at Nässjö Konsthall, 2018

 

LTI-Lightside has been processing film, scanning negatives and making fine-art exhibition prints with Rob for the better part of this decade — we’re always in awe of his steady work ethic and unfailing good nature. See more of his work here.

 

 

 

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MAXXI BVLGARI Prize
Talia Chetri
MAXXI – Museo delle Arti del XXI secolo Rome
May 30th—Oct 28th, 2018

 

 

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MAXXI – Museo delle Arti del XXI secolo Rome

 

Talia Chetrit was chosen as a finalist in the MAXXI BVLGARI Prize, the museum’s project supporting and promoting young artists in partnership with the iconic Italian luxury brand, Bulgari. In October 2018, the jury will select the winner, whose work will be acquired by the museum.

 

 

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Talia Chetrit: MAXXI BVLGARI Prize, installation views
MAXXI – Museo delle Arti del XXI secolo Rome, 2018

 

 

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Dialogue with the Ancient
Lawrence Beck
Palazzo Ducale di Sassuolo
June 1 – September 2

 

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Lawrence Beck: Palazzo Ducale di Sassuolo, 2018
59 x 72 archival pigment print

 

The exhibition, curated by Martina Bagnoli, presents 8 large photographs dedicated to Italian gardens, which, dialogue with the masterpieces of ancient art preserved in the palace.

 

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Lawrence Beck: Palazzo Ducale di Sassuolo install views, 2018
59 x 72 archival pigment prints

 

LTI-Lightside has been producing exhibition prints for Lawrenc beck since 2009. For more images from this exhibition and of Beck’s work in general, please visit his website by clicking here.

 

 

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Showcaller
Talia Chetrit
Kölnischer Kunstverein, Cologne, Germany
February 17 – March 25

 

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Talia Chetrit: Showcaller, Kölnischer Kunstverein, 2018

 

The exhibition, Showcaller, was conceived especially for the Kölnischer Kunstverein, and is comprised of predominately new and revisited works.

 

LTI-Lightside has been producing exhibition works for Talia Chetrit since 2009. See more of her work here.

 

 

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Talia Chetrit: Untitled (Body), 2018, Silver Gelatin Print, 10″ × 7″
from Showcaller, Kölnischer Kunstverein, 2018

 

 

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Talia Chetrit: Nipple/Chain, 2012, Silver Gelatin Print, 20″ × 16″
from Showcaller, Kölnischer Kunstverein, 2018

 

 

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Talia Chetrit: Fennel, 2015, Silver Gelatin Print, 9″ × 12″
from Showcaller, Kölnischer Kunstverein, 2018

 

 

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Talia Chetrit: Showcaller, Kölnischer Kunstverein, 2018

 

 

 

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January 17, 2018
Tina Barney at Paul Kasmin
Landscapes
Tina Barney
Paul Kasmin Gallery
January 17 – March 3

 

 

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Tina Barney: The River, 2017 from Landscapes, Paul Kasmin Gallery, 2018

 

install view Tina Barney: Landscapes, Paul Kasmin Gallery, January 2018

 

From the Paul Kasmin press release:

 

Alongside her oeuvre of portraits portraying the daily life of the social elite that Barney is most known for, exists an entire series of landscape photographs taken by Barney using her 8 by 10-inch view camera.  Barney first began her experimentation with landscape photography in the late 1980s and would not revisit the subject again until the summer of 2017.  Returning to her familiar New England backdrop, Barney champions distant views of shingled houses, rocky coastlines, small town thoroughfares and main street squares, challenging herself out-of-doors to refine and build upon her mastery of compositional tactics.  With these landscapes, Barney takes new ownership over the large format medium of color photography, employing the same sophisticated devices but with an expanded field of vision.

 

 

opening nightTina Barney: Landscapes opening reception, Paul Kasmin Gallery, January 2018

 

 

We’ve been working with Tina Barney since 2010, most recently completing the scanning and file work on over 140 images for her Rizzoli monograph: Tina Barney. See images of the book in our project archive post below and additional exhibition posts here and here. Landscapes is up through March 3rd, see more on the Paul Kasmin website here.

 

 

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Vast: Sea Salt Sand Sky
Joni Sternback
Harn Museum of Art
November 21 – April 22, 2018

 

 

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Joni Sternbach: Harn Museum of Art

 

From the Harn Museum press release:

 

VAST: Sea Salt Sand Sky features over seventy photographs by acclaimed New York artist Joni Sternbach. They picture the sublime vastness of ocean, sky and desert captured on film, and produced as cyanotype, platinum/palladium, gelatin silver or pigment prints and video. VAST also includes Sternbach’s most celebrated series, Surfland, a mesmerizing array of surfer portraits (some of noted surfers) made on beaches around the world in the 19th century wet plate collodion process. Applying almost every photographic form there is, the artist uses a variety of matrices (glass, film, video), camera sizes (the largest, a 16×20” view camera) and lenses (including a 1840s Petzval Portrait lens) to create exquisitely detailed imagery. “I have pursued historic mediums,” says Sternbach, “as a way to have a conversation with history, and play with photography.”

The word “vast” references the subject and scale of Sternbach’s prints, and the reverie she finds there. Her expansive vistas include history (marking the passage of time and change) and the contemporary sublime (terrifying and awesome in the earth’s beauty and power). Her surfer portraits shift this inward meditation outward to where surfer’s bodies and boards master the ocean’s edge, finding euphoria there.
The exhibition is curated by Carol McCusker, PhD, Curator of Photography.

 

 

 

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Joni Sternbach: install views at the Harn Museum of Art

 

LTI-Lightside has been working with Joni Sternbach for over a decade — Joni has generously included us in a number of projects over the years offering an up-close perspective on how she navigates between vintage analogue photography and state of the art digital technology to tell her stories.

 

You can see more of Vast at the Harn Museum of Art by clicking here.

 

 

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November 13, 2017
Tina Barney
Tina Barney
Rizzoli International Publications
2017

Hardcover, 236 pages, 142 image plates

 

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Poser
Talia Chetrit
Sies + Höke
Sept 8 – Oct 8

 

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Talia Chetrit: Poser Sies + Höke, September 2017

 

 

From the Sies + Höke press release:

 

In Poser Talia Chetrit takes her own archive as the subject of an exhibition. In this show she presents two rooms of staged photographs taken over a 23 year span as a contiguous body—portraits taken by Chetrit as a teenager of her friends, all aged 12-15 from 1994-1997, and three new self-portraits shot in 2017. In the first set of photographs we see crops of young girls’ faces, other girls in lackadaisical repose, two listlessly lying on a bed nude as well as more recent, provocative images Chetrit has taken of herself—donning only panty hose on her face or a plastic shirt, both in overly dramatized makeup.

 

The work is possible within scalar and temporal shifts of representation that call the very processes of image making into question—framing and reframing the failures of her subjects’ intentions, of pretense and of appearing. Her preoccupation with the memory of those early shoots gives impetus to this show as something beyond ‘autobiography’, however.  At the time, she—newly behind the lens as an artist—and her friends were enacting their burgeoning agencies through each other, as peers, sharing in the spectacle of these photoshoots; this—opposed to her present experience, in which she uses these same images of the girls, then more than half age that she is now, along side images of her adult self—elicits a potently perverse anachronism. We see structures of power and dynamics of relations, prescience of our younger selves, all stripped bare and redressed by turns.

 

She has consistently, and by necessity, been concerned with the limits of the self-image and the implication of others in her practice. The forensic aspect of this work allows the artist to produce a double take on her own processes. The leaky, violent sophistication of the teen murder scenes alongside the almost clown level of makeup and ‘costuming’ –in both the images taken of her friends, and those she takes of herself–are leveled on a strange plane of equivalence. Like her previous shows, this work sits inside the unbounded intersections of staging and discovery, of human bodies, objects and meaning, which naturally emerge when photography is considered an act of performance—it’s through this process that Chetrit continually reappraises her role as a photographer and that of photography itself.

 

 

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Talia Chetrit: installation view Poser,  Sies + Höke, 2017

 

This is the third exhibition of Chetrit’s work we’ve helped produce for Sies + Höke. We’ve been working with Talia since 2009.

For more on our projects with her click here
For more on I’m selecting at Sies + Höke click here

 

 

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Talia Chetrit: Face 1, 1994 / 2017. 
14″ archival inkjet print

 

 

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Survival Signs
Mounir Fatmi
Jane Lombard Gallery
September 7 – October 21

 

 

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Mounir Fatmi: Calligraphy of Fire, from Survival Signs, Jane Lombard Gallery, September, 2017
32 x 52.5 archival pigment print

 

 

From the Jane Lombard Gallery press release:

 

Jane Lombard Gallery is pleased to present Survival Signs, Mounir Fatmi’s third solo exhibition with the gallery. His work directly addresses the current events in our world and speaks to those whose lives are affected by restrictive political climates. “Survival signs” can also be seen as cultural signs, images, objects, experiences, and their connections and relationships to our everyday life. Is our society fluid, open and accepting, or the opposite? Several of the works in the exhibition teeter along a fine line of interpretation; are they revealing moments of construction or destruction, lightness or darkness? The artist presents his works as signs of survival; elements that allow him to resist and understand the world and its changes.

 

 

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Mounir Fatmi: Survival Signs, Jane Lombard Gallery, September, 2017

 

We were super-happy that Jane Lombard Gallery asked us to print selections for Mounir Fatmi’s Survuval Signs exhibition … but  we were truly floored by his “open letter” regarding his decision not to travel to Trump’s new USA:

 

Open letter from Mounir Fatmi

 

As you can see, it’s been hard for me to write this letter. I had to wait until the last minute. I needed an emergency- the same emergency that drives me to create art in any circumstance, like an ambulance that takes every possible risk in order to save a life. In this case, it’s my life I’m talking about.

 

I left Morocco for good in 1999 in search of a freedom of speech I couldn’t find at home.

 

I had to cut off all ties with my father, my family, my neighborhood and ultimately my country. I wanted to take a step back, to get as far as possible from my cultural context.

 

I wanted to experience the world. Meet people. Read the forbidden books. Discovering the Beat generation and its authors allowed me to get away. My encounter with Paul Bowles in Tangiers was decisive. Reading Kerouac, Ginsberg, Burroughs, discovering Brion Gysin’s calligraphy… All this nourishment allowed me to live, to hope and to dream of a better world.

 

While I was studying in Rome, I discovered Fra Angelico’s small painting from the 15th century, The Healing of the Deacon Justinian. In the painting, the brothers Damian and Cosmas graft the leg of a black man onto the white body of Deacon Justinian. After just one look at this painting, I understood that I was that black leg. I was surprised that everyone around me only saw the perspective, the light and the composition in the painting. I was the only one to see this black leg. This alien element has been living within me and made me who I am today. A survivor. An immigrant worker. A permanent exile.

 

I haven’t changed nationalities. I still travel with my Moroccan passport, which is a work of art in itself. That passport is filled with visas from several countries where I’ve shown my work these last few years. Traveling with a Moroccan passport is an adventure. I’m never sure I’ll get through customs. In addition to the fatigue of traveling, I have to face the stressful interviews by customs agents. One of the most traumatizing experiences I’ve had was with American customs, a few years back. After three hours of questioning and getting my fingerprints and my picture taken, the agent presented me with a bible and asked me to swear that everything I had told him about me and my relatives was the truth. I told him that the reason I was in this situation in the first place was because I’m supposed to be a Muslim and therefore I didn’t see why he was giving me a bible to swear the truth.

 

Without acknowledging the remark I had just made, he asked me again to swear on the bible, looking straight at me this time. I put my hand on the bible. He asked me to raise the other hand and say: I swear. I swore. I just didn’t want him to send me off to Guantanamo under any pretense. That instant was for me a moment of extreme lucidity. No more illusions. I live in a world I am not able to understand.

 

Of course the customs agent was only doing his job, and his job required him to be afraid of me. His fear wounded me, and I carry it like a scar to this day.

 

I wanted to help him, but I couldn’t. The more I tried to reassure him, the more suspicious I grew to him.

 

I know that I am just a speck of dust in this machine. A black leg grafted on the body of another man. What I’m relating in this letter is nothing compared to what thousands of refugees endure, dodging death as they hope for a better world for them and their children. I’ve always believed that America could be a part of that world. That heart capable of welcoming us all and warming us. My illusions were shattered the night the result of the latest election was announced. My disappointment was huge. I realized that we may never see again this free world we dreamed of so much.

 

Today, I don’t have the strength nor the courage to offer myself to a terrorized customs agent faced with a poor Arab artist. I know the situation of immigrants in the USA has gotten worse since the latest immigration laws. That getting through the border is more and more difficult. This time I would be incapable of swearing on any holy book or of accepting any more humiliations. I must protect whatever little hope I have left. That hope is my survival.

 

I trust you in presenting my work to the gallery’s public. I hope one day I can find the courage to come and see you.

 

 
Mounir Fatmi, August 18th, 2017

 

 

 

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